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Posts Tagged ‘lgbt’

So. . . when I first saw this blog post from LivLuna, I wasn’t sure how to feel about something called “SlutWalk.” 

If I’m being totally honest, I have to admit that I have been known to call a girl or two “sluts”–without really knowing anything about them, other than how they were dressed.  I always knew it was wrong to judge others like that. . . but what can I say?  I’m opinionated. 

But after reading about SlutWalk and watching the video above, I can’t help but reevaluate my use of the words “slut” and “bitch.”  What they’re saying is true.  Using words like that does make it sound like it’s OK to judge women based on what clothes they wear or how much make-up they have on–and gives people a socially accepted way to discriminate and even abuse women. 

In some cases, the way a woman was dressed has even been used as a defense for rape, and THAT is the kind of stereotyping that SlutWalk is trying to fight against.

The New York Post may think that SlutWalks are “feminist folly” and “idiocy,” but as far as I’m concerned, it has really gotten me to reconsider what words like “slut” really mean.  I’m vowing to think a little more before I speak unkindly of others.

 And I plan to attend SlutWalk NYC on August 20, 2011!

Wanna join in?  RSVP to the Facebook Event.

Vote in the poll below or comment and let me know what you think!  Like this post?  Be sure to click “like” or share with your friends on facebook and twitter!
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Someone recently asked me about my “coming out” story.  I don’t talk about it much because. . . well. . . it’s just not that exciting.  Even my sister’s coming out story is more interesting than mine!

Hell, to be honest, I wasn’t even that nervous about coming out–except to my mom. 

I knew she’d still love me. . . but she had been asking me for years if I liked girls. . . and I always told her “No, I don’t think so” or “Nope, no girl fantasies for me.”

And it was true!  I had never had any interest girls. . . but I hadn’t had any interest in guys either.  Naturally, she was wondering. 

FINALLY, in May of my junior year of high school, it happened–my first real crush on a girl.  I knew I had to tell my mom the truth.

So that Saturday, my mom and I were in her Mustang and she was driving me to my lame part-time job at the public library.  About two minutes into the drive (it only took five to get to the library from home), I finally got up the courage to say something.

“Mom.”

“What?”

“I like Kim.”

“Like. . . what?”  She looked confused.

“I like Kim.  A lot.”  I tried to sound casual.

“Like. . . as a friend?  Or like you wanna date her?”

“I’m going out with her.”

“So. . . you’re gay?”  She put on her turn signal.

“I don’t know.” 

“What do you mean you don’t know?  You like girls, right?” 

“No.  I like Kim.  Beyond that, I don’t know.” 

“You picked now to tell me?” she asked, as we pulled up to the library and she put the parking break on.

“. . . . Yes?”

She gave me a look and shook her head. 

“I love you,” she said, and leaned over to give me a hug.  “Have a good day at work.”

“Love you, too!”  I hugged her and got out of the car. 

That was in 2006, and to this day, she still makes fun of me for coming out the day before Mother’s Day.

“What kind of a Mother’s Day present is that?!”

I’d like to thank my mom for raising me to be such a confident, well-adjusted kid.  I’m nothing compared to some of the other crazies at my college.  =P 

Pretty sure my mom must have one of those in her closet somewhere. . .
 
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So. . . while I was home visiting my family for Easter, my mom asked me this question:

If you found out that there was a drug you could take that would make you straight, would you take it?

I didn’t even hesitate to tell her “No.”

And she was surprised that I wouldn’t want to be straight if I could be.

Ever since I first realized that I was a lesbian and came out, it’s been such an integral part of my life.  While it’s far from being the only important factor in defining who I am, it is still a major part of who I consider myself to be and how I think about myself.  It has affected the decisions I’ve made, the way I have viewed the world, and the person I have become.   

To put it quite simply. . . I can no longer even imagine life as a straight woman.

I’m sure there are plenty of people who would just love to find a miracle “cure” for “the gay”–probably the same people who send their kids to “ex-gay camps” to turn them straight.   

For the same reason I’d never go to one of those camps or programs, I would never want to take a drug or hormone therapy to change my orientation.  There is nothing wrong with me the way I am, and I am perfectly happy being me. 

Pretty well adjusted for a gay kid, huh? 

“Baby, I was born this way.” —Lady Gaga

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So. . . I got a call back from the PR people at Paul Weiss.  They’re insisting that an interview with Edie Windsor is impossible.  Unfortunately, it looks like my quest is a no-go for now (but they can bet I’ll be the first in line when the case is over).  At least I tried.  =P

I’ll have a new post coming soon.

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Kobe Bryant of the Los Angeles Lakers NBA team was fined $100,000 yesterday and earned himself condemnation from the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), according to an article in the New York Times.

His crime:  calling a referee a “fucking faggot” after being called on a foul.

In recent years, there have been a growing number of celebrities being called out on these sorts of outbursts, using gay slurs.  Even Perez Hilton, an openly gay blogger, was criticized by the HRC for an anti-gay slur he used in a confrontation with will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas in 2009.

The excuse used by both Bryant and Hilton was that it was in the heat of the moment–it was just an angry outburst.

But does that excuse this kind of behavior?  Would we excuse Tom Brady if he called someone a “nigger”?  Would Bryant get away with it?  Would another basketball player be allowed to call Yao Ming a “chink”?

In addition to paying the $100,000 fine, Bryant called the HRC to apologize for his actions.  In 2009, Hilton also issued an apology, as did many other celebrities caught using racial or anti-gay slurs in recent years.

People (not only celebrities) need to learn and understand that anti-gay slurs are no more acceptable in a free society than racial slurs or any other kind of slur.  We need to send a message that there is no excuse for using anti-gay slurs–saying “I was just mad” is not a Get-Out-of-Jail-Free card, anymore.

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Dawn Henderson, a student at De Soto Middle School in Louisiana, was issued an ultimatum when she wore this shirt to school.  She was sent to the principal’s office and her grandfather was called to bring her different clothes.  She could either change or go home.

What kind of a message is that sending to other students?

Personally, I think the principal and any other teacher or administrator who was involved in this story should be ashamed for trying to take away a student’s right to freedom of speech.  Dawn Henderson should be commended for wearing that shirt and showing support for her peers, regardless of their sexual orientation.  Statistics say 9 out of 10 gay students are bullied at school–shouldn’t we be punishing the bullies instead of Dawn?

I’m only 21 years old.  I remember what it was like in middle school and high school.  If you wore a shirt with a “bad word” or a picture of a beer bottle on it, they made you turn the shirt inside-out.  But is this really the same situation?

In recent years, public schools have been going through campaigns to end bullying, both in and out of classroom.  Many schools across the country renewed their anti-bullying efforts in the last year, following a number of teen suicides–particularly the suicides of gay youngsters.

The shirt, produced by FCKH8.com, is one of a number of designs being sold to raise money for queer youth counseling services and suicide prevention.

The school principal claimed that the shirt was “distracting,” but none of the other students seemed to notice or have a problem with it.  And even if other students did have a problem with it, since when do we allow other students to decide what their classmates are or are not allowed to wear?  Unless bad grammar is a capital offense, I don’t see any reason why this shirt should not be allowed in schools.

Just because someone is in the majority does not mean that they are in the right.

Want to buy your own shirt like Dawn’s?  Or a wristband?  Or a hoodie?  Click here to check out all of the great products for sale from FCKH8!

Want to know more about Dawn’s story?  You can read the whole article here, or you can watch the television news coverage here.

Comment and let me know what you think or vote in the poll below.  Like this post?  Be sure to click “like” or share with your friends on facebook and twitter!

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It’s official.  My younger sister is a lesbian, too–and I’m just not sure how to feel about it.

Ever since I came out at age 16, my family has always been supportive of me–and I knew they would be, so I never felt any pressure to hide anything.  I know I’ve been lucky to have so much love and support, and I know that my sister can expect the same love and support from me and the rest of our family.

So why did she wait so long to come out of the closet?

You’d think that after seeing me come out and how accepting everyone was, my sister would have felt safe coming out to us–or at least to me.

Apparently, we thought wrong.  She says that even after she knew she was gay (at least a couple years ago), she didn’t want to come out because she didn’t want to upset anyone or cause stress to the family.  She’s 19 years old, and just now coming out to the rest of us. 

This got me thinking:  Why do so many people choose to stay in the closet?  Even in a time where it’s become widely accepted? 

Of course there are the standard reasons: unaccepting families, conservative belief systems, religious persecution, etc., but what are some of the reasons that may be overlooked? 

Comment and let me know what you think.  Like this article?  Be sure to click “like” or share with your friends on facebook and twitter!

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